British students able to speak other languages

IELTS Writing Task 1: ‘languages’ charts

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A student asked me to look at the task below. It comes from Cambridge IELTS book 11, and the data was originally shown on two pie charts. I’ve used tables just to make things really clear.

The charts below show the proportions of British students at one university in England who were able to speak other languages in addition to English, in 2000 and 2010.

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Note:
I gave a useful tip for this task in this lesson from back in 2016.

WT1.10.2 Body 1 - Overview paragraph - Graph Trends - Writing Task 1 Lessons - 8IELTS - Học Tiếng Anh công nghệ cao

The bar charts compare the proportions of British university students who speak different language in addition to English over period of ten years.

It is clear that the major British students were able to speak at least one other language, we can also see that the proportion of students can speak second or third language which was increase over ten years.

In 2000, the percentage of students could speak one or two foreign language was 80% while 20% for the speaker only spoke mother tongue. Ten years later, there was a increase 5% the proportion who spoke the second language and the proportion of students did not lean other language which decreased from 20% to 10%.

It is noticeable from the both pie charts, Spanish language was the most popular foreign language which the British student chose, was 30% in 2000 and 35% in 2002. And the proportion of student spoke French and German language placed the same level, was 10% in 2002.

The pie charts compare the figure for British students who studied at a university in the UK in terms of bilingual or multilingual beside the mother tongue in 2000 and 2010.

It can be observed that most British students were able to speak other languages in addition to English in both years. Also, Spanish was the most popular language that students used to communicate.

In 2000, 80% of students were able to speak other languages, while only 20% of students spoke English. Over a decade, the proportions of those who spoke both a second language and two foreign languages increased by 5%, about 20% and 15% respectively.

Ten years later, the majority of British students could interact in Spanish rose by 5%, accounting for 30%. However, there was a 5% fall in the percentage of those speaking French, at 20%. German was the only language that had no change in the proportion of speakers over the years shown (10%), fewer than 10% of France speakers.

the tables give a compararion about the percentage of British university students who spoke different languages in addition to English in two separate years.
It is noticeable that in both years, 2000 and 2010, the majority of British students at the university in question were able to speak at least one other language and the number of students can speak only Spanish were the most
In the year 2000, 80% of the students were able to speak one or two foreign languages, and 20% only spoke English. Ten years later, there was a rise of 5% in the proportion of those who spoke a second language. There was also an increase, from 10% to 15%, in the proportion of students who were able to speak two foreign languages.
In second languages spoken, in 2000, 30% of the students were able to speak Spanish, 15% spoke French, and 10% spoke German. By 2010, the proportion of Spanish speakers had risen by 5% to 35%, there were 5% fewer French speakers, and the figure for German speakers remained at ten. The number of students can speak another language went up from 15 to 20% during the period.

IELTS Writing Task 1: ‘languages’ charts

Here are my first two paragraphs (introduction and overview) for the task that I shared in last Thursday’s lesson:

The tables compare the percentages of British university students who spoke different languages in addition to English in two separate years.

It is noticeable that in both years, 2000 and 2010, the majority of British students at the university in question were able to speak at least one other language. We can also see an increase in the proportion of second and third language speakers over the 10-year period.

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IELTS Writing Task 1: grouping the information

Look at the information in the tables, and then look at the two paragraphs below them. Can you see how I’ve grouped the information? In other words, what is the main idea of each paragraph?

In the year 2000, 80% of the students were able to speak one or two foreign languages, and 20% only spoke English. Ten years later, there was a rise of 5% in the proportion of those who spoke a second language. There was also an increase, from 10% to 15%, in the proportion of students who were able to speak two foreign languages.

Looking at the specific second languages spoken, in 2000, 30% of the students were able to speak Spanish, 15% spoke French, and 10% spoke German. By 2010, the proportion of Spanish speakers had risen to 35%, there were 5% fewer French speakers, and the figure for German speakers remained at one in ten. Finally, we can see that the percentage of speakers of other second languages, apart from Spanish, French and German, rose from 15% to 20% over the period shown.

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The tables compare the percentages of British university students who spoke different languages in addition to English in two separate years.

It is noticeable that in both years, 2000 and 2010, the majority of British students at the university in question were able to speak at least one other language. We can also see an increase in the proportion of second and third language speakers over the 10-year period.

In the year 2000, 80% of the students were able to speak one or two foreign languages, and 20% only spoke English. Ten years later, there was a rise of 5% in the proportion of those who spoke a second language. There was also an increase, from 10% to 15%, in the proportion of students who were able to speak two foreign languages.

Looking at the specific second languages spoken, in 2000, 30% of the students were able to speak Spanish, 15% spoke French, and 10% spoke German. By 2010, the proportion of Spanish speakers had risen to 35%, there were 5% fewer French speakers, and the figure for German speakers remained at one in ten. Finally, we can see that the percentage of speakers of other second languages, apart from Spanish, French and German, rose from 15% to 20% over the period shown.

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IELTS Writing Task 1: did you notice the 80%?

In my experience, not many people are able to write a good overview / summary paragraph under exam conditions. They can see specific information, but they find it difficult to see the “big picture”.

Let’s try looking for the “big picture” in some data. We can then write a good overview or summary.

Percentage of students able to speak languages other than English:

30% - Spanish
15% - French
10% - German
15% - another language (not Spanish, French or German)
10% - two other languages
20% - no other language

(adapted from Cambridge IELTS book 11)

Writing your overview / summary paragraph:

I’m sure you noticed the biggest number straight away (30% - Spanish), and we could certainly mention this in our overview. Many people then look for the smallest number, but I wouldn’t do that in this case. I think there is something better that we can mention: the 80% of students who are able to speak at least one foreign language. Did you notice the 80%?

Here’s my 2-sentence overview / summary:

It is noticeable that the vast majority of students are able to speak at least one foreign language, as well as English. We can also see that Spanish is the most widely spoken second language among the surveyed group of students.

PS. I don’t usually include numbers in my summary, so I wrote ‘vast majority’ instead of 80%, and ‘most widely spoken second language’ instead of 30%. We can add the figures in our “details” paragraphs.

The pie charts compare the percentages of British students at a university in England who could speak more than one language beside English in two years 2000 and 2010.

It is clear that the majority of British students were able to speak two or three languages in both years. There was a marginally increase in the proportion of university students spoke languages other than English in ten year period.

In 2000, the slice of two or three languages speakers was 80%, and only 20% did not speak other language except from native language.For ten years later, the percentage of students who spoke one or two foreign languages went up by 10%, of which the rate of people spoke the second language rose by 5% and there was a 5% growth in the proportion of students spoke two others language, from 10% in 2000 to 15% in 2010.

30% of students spoke Spanish as a foreign language in 2000, and the figure increased at 35% in 2010. There was no change in the percentage of German speakers for ten year period shown, at 10%. Especially, the slice of people who spoke French reduced slightly, from 15% in 2000 to 10% in 2010. Finally, the proportion of students who spoke another language, different from French, German and Spanish marked an upward trend by 5%, to 20% in 2010.

The pie charts illustrate the percentage of British university students who could speak languages other than their mother language in 2000 and 2010.

In both years, 2000 and 2010, most of British students could use at least one other language. There was a slight rise in use of second and third language over period.

As can be shown in detail chart, in 2000, 80% of students were able to use one or two foreign languages, and 20% spoke mother tongue only. Ten years later, there was a slight increase of 5% in the rate of people who spoke another language. The students who could use two foreign languages increased from 10% to 15%.

In 2000, 30% of the students were able to speak Spanish, 15% used French, and 10% spoke German respectively. By 2010, the proportion of Spanish speakers had increased to 35%, there were 5% fewer French speakers, and the figure for German speakers still remained unchanged. In overall, it was shown that the percentage of speakers of other second languages, apart from Spanish, French and German, went from 15% to 20% over the period shown.

The two tables compare the percentages of British students who spoke different languages (not including English) in 2000 and 2010.
Overall, it is clear that the majority of British students were able to speak foreign languages in both years. In these years, Spanish accounted for the biggest slice. There was an upward trend in the proportion of students using another language and two other languages throughout the years shown.
In 2000, up to 80% of students were able to speak at least one or two different languages while just 20% used English only. In 2010, there was a 5% increase in the percentage of those who were able to speak a second language. There was a similar rise in the proportion of students who spoke two different languages, from 10% to 15%.
It is noticeable from the pie charts that Spanish is the most widely spoken language. The number of people using Spanish throughout the period saw an upward trend, from 30% to 35%. In contrast, the figures for French and English both fell to 10%. The figure for German remained the same, which was at 10% over the 10 year period.