IELTS Speaking Part 2: 'hurry' topic

IELTS Speaking Part 2: ‘hurry’ topic

Here’s an interesting part 2 question that someone sent me:

Describe a time when you had to do something in a hurry.
You should say

- what you were doing
- when this was
- why you had to hurry
- and explain how you felt at that time

If you can remember a real example of a time when you were in a rush recently, use that. Alternatively, you could try to adapt a topic that you have already prepared (e.g. attending an event or celebration - you could say that you were late).

Feel free to share your ideas in the ‘comments’ area below. I’ll continue with this topic next week.

IELTS Speaking: ‘hurry topic’ mistakes

Here are some sentences that people shared below last week’s lesson. Can you find and correct the mistake(s) in each sentence.

  1. I made a huge mistake, which hardly made me miss the flight.
  2. I was very hurry to get back to that restaurant.
  3. I was so stressed, even I forgot something that I needed to bring.
  4. I had two days for research the information.
  5. I had applied this job when I was still in my previous job.
  6. I forget my admit card in file at home and I realise it when I reached the bus stand.
  7. I remembered when I was studied in 9 grades, there was a final exam and I forgot it.
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IELTS Speaking Part 2: ‘hurry’ answer

Let’s return to the ‘hurry’ question that I showed you a few weeks ago:

Describe a time when you had to do something in a hurry.
You should say

- what you were doing
- when this was
- why you had to hurry
- and explain how you felt at that time

Here’s my sample answer:

  • I’m going to talk about a time when I had to hurry to get ready for a trip with some colleagues while I was working in a previous job.
  • It was a Monday morning about five years ago. A group of us had to catch an early flight, and a senior member of our department had volunteered to drive us to the airport. I was supposed to be ready and waiting to be picked up from my home at 5.30am, and my colleague had asked me to look out for his car so that he didn’t have to ring my doorbell.
  • The problem was that I overslept. I had set my alarm, but somehow I must have turned it off and carried on sleeping. Suddenly, at 5.30am, my doorbell rang and I looked over at my alarm clock. I immediately realised what had happened, and I sprang out of bed and got dressed in record time. I splashed some water on my face, quickly brushed my teeth, and put my shoes on without properly tying the laces. Then I picked up my suitcase and coat, and left the house.
  • I can still remember the moment when the doorbell woke me up and I saw the time: I was filled with a sense of panic and fear as I realised that my colleagues were waiting outside. Then, when I left my house and walked towards the awaiting car, I felt so embarrassed because it was obvious that I hadn’t been ready on time.
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IELTS Vocabulary: phrasal verbs

I used several phrasal verbs (e.g. pick up, look out for, turn off, carry on) in my description in yesterday’s lesson.

These verbs look easy, but they are good examples of the kind of natural, idiomatic language that native speakers use. The tricky thing about phrasal verbs is that you have to learn what each one means; you can’t understand them by translating the individual words.

For example, I used “pick up” to mean “collect” (I was waiting for my colleague to collect me), but “pick up” can also mean improve, learn quickly, or receive. Have a look at this page on a grammar website. Can you see why phrasal verbs might impress the examiner if you use them correctly?

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